Subnet Cheat Sheet

This is part of the Cisco Notes series on Mike’s World News.

I think one of the most important things to write down once you get into the testing center during the Cisco tutorial is your CIDR notation, with the # of hosts, and the full Subnet Mask.  I would go from /22 – /30, although that is my personal preference. 
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Cisco Access Control Lists Notes

This is part of the Cisco Notes series on Mike’s World News

Standard Access Control Lists (ACLs) are 1-99 and 1300-1999.
Extended ACLs are 100-199 and 2000-2699.

Standard ACLs are typically placed close to the destination.
Extended ACLs are typically placed close to the source.
I remember this as: SD/ES
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Spanning Tree Notes

This is part of the Cisco Notes series on Mike’s World News.

Spanning-Tree Protocol or STP is IEEE standard 802.1d.
Rapid Spanning-Tree Protocol or RSTP is IEEE standard 802.1w.

The first manufactured switch will be, by default, the root switch in a Spanning Tree.  This is because it has the lowest bridge ID (lowest priority plus mac address) is the root switch.  If all switches are using the default priority of 32768, then the switch with the lowest MAC address is the root switch.

With Spanning-Tree, LOWER IS ALWAYS BETTER.
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Cisco Notes

I’m still working on Cisco ICND-2, which I started over the summer, but with everything going on, I haven’t got it finished yet.  I thought I’d start typing up some notes as I study to help me better learn the information.  I will be presenting these notes in the coming days on Mike’s World News and in no particular order.

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Another new host

A little over a year ago, I switched from hosting my Blog on a Windows Server in my home office to using a cheap paid hosting company.  This company was pretty good for about 9-months.  Its been a disaster since then.  I have finally switched this blog off.  I’ll be switching the Wife’s soon.  If you have noticed a decrease in activity since about April, the problems we have been having with the host, as well as school for me is the reason.

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Verizon Wireless & Emery Telcom

My whole family have Verizon Wireless cell phones.  We don’t have many problems with them so even though they are more expensive then other wireless carriers, we continue to use them.  About a week ago, however, Verizon Wireless customers are no longer able to call customers of Emery Telcom, which services rural Utah.  Call to VZW tech support has not been helpful.  They keep saying they are looking into it and, originally it was suppose to be fixed by the end of the day.  Now they are saying 5 more days.

Emery Telcom immediately jumps up and down and blames Verizon Wireless, without looking into the problem.

Anyone else ever had problems where an entire carrier is unable to call another carrier?  If you have Verizon Wireless and you want to see what it does, try calling Emery Telcom’s office at 435.748.2223.

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Oh Cisco

For years I have wanted to start learning how to operate Cisco Systems’ routers and switches.  One of the reasons that I decided to go ahead with finishing my Bachelors through Western Governors University is that I would have 3 Cisco classes / Certifications (CCENT, CCNA, and CCNA Security).  I finished the 1st class a few days ago.  The class was tough, but manageable.  I really understand why 80%ish of the IT world uses Cisco.  These things are great.  Now, to start switching work to Cisco…  that might be harder than the test! 🙂

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Removing Rootkit.Zlob

As most of you know, I own a computer repair company called Las Vegas Geeks.  One of the most common problems I run into is viruses, spyware, or some other kind of malware.  There are some great utilities out there to help clean up these problems, but new malware comes out faster then the tools to clean them up.  Yesterday, I was at two different places that had the same malware, Rootkit.Zlob.  I was able to most of the problems fixed using ComboFix, Hijack This, Spybot and a quick scan of MalwareBytes’ Anti-malware.  But the system was still running very sluggish.  I did a full scan with MalwareBytes and it would find two results of Rootkit.Zlob in the C:\Documents and Settings\%Username%\ folder.  When I tried to remove this with Malwarebytes, the system would freeze up. I could find the folder with the Command Prompt, but of course, since its a rootkit, I couldn’t remove it or find anything inside of the folder.  I thought about trying to use Windows Recovery Console, but since the problem is the Documents and Settings folder, the default settings of Recovery Console would not have allowed me to get into this folder.  And the system was running slowly enough that I didn’t want to try to change those settings.  So, I used a LiveCD and booted up the system.  I could then find this folder and remove it.  The system ran great after that.  I should also have had the same results plugging the drive into a different PC, although I didn’t try that.

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